Vertical Takeoff and Vertical Landing, Now Available for Model Rockets

Strictly rocketry/space related discussion only

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
crom
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 329
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 9:13 pm
Location: Brisbane
Contact:

Vertical Takeoff and Vertical Landing, Now Available for Model Rockets

Postby crom » Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:00 pm

One of the QRS members just sent me this link:

https://blog.hackster.io/vertical-takeo ... b766845e4f

When will AusRocketry have them in stock????
QRS #100 President
AMRS #20 L3

http://qldrocketry.com/

blackshire
Rocket Flyer
Rocket Flyer
Posts: 78
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2015 5:07 pm

Re: Vertical Takeoff and Vertical Landing, Now Available for Model Rockets

Postby blackshire » Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:39 am

Powered vertical landings were achieved with model rockets many years ago, and a hobbyist rocket that operates similarly to the SpaceX Falcon 9's first stage (all except the rocket-braked touchdown--this model is covered below) is flying today. Back in the 1960s or 1970s, an American model rocketeer built and flew a scale model of the Surveyor unmanned lunar soft-landing spacecraft (it was covered in the NAR--National Association of Rocketry--journal at the time). It used three black powder model rocket motors as retro-rockets, which were mounted at the lander framework's three corners (near the landing legs' hinge points), just as each of the actual Surveyor probes used three throttle-able liquid propellant vernier engines that were mounted at those locations. (A large spherical solid rocket motor housed inside the framework, plus the verniers, slowed the lander down from ~6,000 mph to about 250 mph approximately 6 miles above the surface, after which the spent motor was jettisoned and the verniers gradually braked the spacecraft to a stop 13 feet above the surface; they then shut down and the vehicle fell the rest of the way, equivalent to a ~2 foot fall on Earth in the weaker lunar gravity.) Also:

If memory serves, the scale model Surveyor was dropped from a considerable height rather than being launched upward under the power of another rocket motor or motors. Its three model rocket retro-motors were ignited at the correct instant (I don't remember how exactly; it may have had some kind of height-determining sensor, or a timer), such that the model touched down at--or very close to--zero velocity. It "flew" successfully several times (five, if I recall correctly), but on the sixth attempt one motor failed to ignite, which caused the model to tumble and crash, and:

This very thing happened to Surveyor 2, which was launched the day I was born--September 20, 1966--after one of its three vernier engines failed to ignite during an attempted mid-course trajectory correction maneuver. Its wild tumbling could not be stopped, and it impacted on the lunar surface at about 6,000 miles per hour, like the previous Ranger series of television camera-equipped lunar impact probes. With today's highly-capable micro-electronics, we're getting closer to completely flight-realistic models of Blue Origin's New Shepard & New Glenn, and SpaceX's Falcon 9. A hobbyist rocket called the Scout C1 (see: http://www.oldrocketforum.com/showthrea ... ight=Scout ) ascends under thrust vector control, then deploys four Falcon 9-like landing legs to land upon, after its parachute-supported descent. An accelerometer/timer module would enable such a model to be boosted upward by one rocket motor (or a group of motors), then descend and fire one or more retro-motors at the correct time--as with the Surveyor model--to touch down very gently.

User avatar
crom
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 329
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 9:13 pm
Location: Brisbane
Contact:

Re: Vertical Takeoff and Vertical Landing, Now Available for Model Rockets

Postby crom » Sun Nov 12, 2017 8:09 pm

Interesting stuff, thanks for the info.
QRS #100 President
AMRS #20 L3

http://qldrocketry.com/


Return to “Rocketry Control Room”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest