Acceleron V - build thread

Water Rockets NSW

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air.command
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Postby air.command » Sun May 10, 2009 10:33 pm

This weekend we continued a little more on the base plate.

Here are all the individual components:

Image

We also machined up the air supply connector/retention mechanism, and is now fully attached. Here the base plate is fully assembled.

Image

In this photo the base plate is connected to the staging mechanism, which is still under construction.

Image

Other than gluing the struts in, the base plate is now pretty much finished.

Next on the list is a non-return valve and a lightweight safety pressure release valve. Both of which will be housed in the long PVC tube. The pressure release valve is needed incase we need to abort a launch when the sustainer is already pressurised. The boosters already have the pressure release valve built into the launcher.

Air to the sustainer goes through a long 3mm ID plastic tubing (not shown) from the base plate through the middle of the PVC pipe. We've pressure tested this tube to 180psi for 2 minutes.
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air.command
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Postby air.command » Mon May 11, 2009 7:15 pm

Here is an assembly test to see how things will go together:

Image

A Standard sized kid has been used for comparison. (the nosecone is 1 inch from the ceiling)

Okay I admit I ran the simulation ..... and without the sustainer .... the booster could lob him 4 meters into the air. :D :wink:
Crop Circles: ... just a bunch of guys looking for their rockets ....

Avachovy
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Postby Avachovy » Mon May 11, 2009 7:44 pm

:shock:

BEST

RIDE

EVER! :D

but seriously, that thing looks awesome! Im so going to the next launch and watching that thing go
Will fly beer for rockets

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Postby ~RR~ » Mon May 11, 2009 8:13 pm

that is one serious water rocket 8)

Avachovy wrote:Im so going to the next launch and watching that thing go

I'll just have to wait for the video...
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Kryten
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Postby Kryten » Tue May 12, 2009 9:01 am

You're going to need a bigger step-ladder
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Postby ROCKet STAR » Tue May 12, 2009 9:50 am

That thing is very impressive! Like everyone else i'll be sure to be there to see it go!
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air.command
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Postby air.command » Tue May 12, 2009 2:55 pm

It's looking less and less likely we'll get to fly it at this month's launch due to insufficient time to get it finished and tested, but should definitely be ready for next month's launch.

Kryten: You are right, we may need to bring the longer step ladder. I'm considering moving a lot of the controls further down on the sustainer where they can be reached from the ground.

We also still need to finish painting our next pyro rocket (Praetor - http://www.suburbanrocketry.com/Praetor.html) that we bought from Suburban Rocketry. It's been a fun build, and we'll be launching it on a C6-5. (you can just see it on the table in the photo above, and its parachute is practicing hanging from a tree)
Crop Circles: ... just a bunch of guys looking for their rockets ....

october sky
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Postby october sky » Tue May 12, 2009 5:13 pm

That truly is one serious "water squirt" !!! 8) :lol:
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Postby water rocketry man » Thu May 14, 2009 8:45 pm

WOW man that is awsomely awesome dude one day your gonnah try to reach the stratosphere with a water rocket. Why no Try flour on this one once you want to get rid of it :lol:

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Postby air.command » Mon May 18, 2009 10:58 pm

Here are some more details of the staging mechanism:

Completely disassembled view of the staging mechanism:
Image

The assembled staging mechanism with the cover removed from the servo box. The cover is there to protect the servos from the water spray as the rocket separates. There is a small hole in the side of the cover for the release strings. Here it is being tested with the dual flight computers. These and the batteries will be located in the top section of the booster segments in the parachute compartments well away from the water. The second set of servos is used for parachute deployment.
Image

A closer look at the release head. We are using springs this time instead of rubber bands as they don't perish like rubber does when stays stretched for longer period of time.
Image

Each servo is connected to the release arm separately, so that if either or both activates then hopefully staging will happen.
Crop Circles: ... just a bunch of guys looking for their rockets ....

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Postby october sky » Tue May 19, 2009 11:16 am

You really do impressive work George, looks great :!: 8)
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air.command
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Postby air.command » Wed May 27, 2009 10:33 am

I've posted an update on our main site with some further details of the build here:

http://home.people.net.au/~aircommand/day77.htm
(there is a short video of some of the tests as well)

We had a go at steam bending some balsa wood for the top support brace that will hold the boosters together. We are just waiting for the wood to completely dry before gluing it and applying a couple of layers of fiberglass.

Note to self: make little holes in the mold next time to let the wood dry faster. :(

Testing of the staging mechanism also went well at full pressure, so we are happy about that. Next up are the parachute deployment mechanisms and fins.
Crop Circles: ... just a bunch of guys looking for their rockets ....

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Postby air.command » Wed May 27, 2009 1:54 pm

I will be using two parachutes for this rocket. They will be deployed separately by different systems. Each parachute individually should be enough to bring the rocket to a safe landing.

I will again suspend the rocket by its side so that it comes down horizontally. This is to increase the drag on the way down, as well as keeping the nozzles protected while landing.

My question is this: Since it is likely (*crossed fingers*) that both parachutes will be deployed, which is the better configuration for the parachutes? Should they be stacked or adjacent? Is one way better than the other in terms of likelyhood of tangling or their effects on each other in terms of drag?


Image

Each is tied to a different booster segment. I really do not want to be setting up a system where one would pull out the other.

Any thoughts on parachute arrangement would be most welcome.
Crop Circles: ... just a bunch of guys looking for their rockets ....

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Postby october sky » Wed May 27, 2009 4:44 pm

My "Mercy MK 2" had two parachutes and I launched it at least a dozen times ( I do have a log but too lazy to go and count the launches :roll:). I had them adjacent to each other. They deployed ok but had tendency to want to tangle a bit. Naturally it mainly depends how far apart they are from each other. :)

There are many people here that have launched many more rockets than me and most likely with more than one chute and could answer this question but from my experience the " stacked" system should work real well.
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air.command
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Postby air.command » Thu Jun 04, 2009 1:30 pm

Thanks for that info october sky. I think I will try the adjacent option first. I spent some time looking at various rockets that use multiple parachutes, and often they seem to be adjacent to each other. (Shuttle SRBs, Apollo capsule etc.) Mind you these are big rockets and I am not sure how well that translates to model rockets.

http://displaydisks.com/images/srb.jpg

http://www.richard-seaman.com/Aircraft/AirShows/Edwards2005/Highlights/C17DroppingLoad_1.jpg

http://www.spaceaholic.com/casper_splashdown.jpg

http://www.teambuildingshop.com/acatalog/Parachutes_01.jpg :D
Crop Circles: ... just a bunch of guys looking for their rockets ....


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