3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Discussions on low powered model rockets using E powered motors and below.

Moderator: Moderators

Aquaman33
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 256
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:12 pm

3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby Aquaman33 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 6:21 pm

I bought a new 3d printer and to celebrate I thought I would teach myself how to use Fusion 360. Until now I have been using SketchUp, which served a purpose, but had some limitations.

I thought I should put my very limited Fusion 360 skills and my new printer to the test with a fun, simple rocket designed to fly on D and E motors.

I started by drawing various fin cans, but in the end I decided to go with this one from Thingiverse:
Image

The design can be found here:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3614897
Thanks "Works of Claye".

At first I printed it in clear filament, then I learnt that clear filament is quite brittle because it doesn't have many additives in it. So I re-printed it in blue:
Image

Image

Image

It is nicely designed to take a 24mm motor mount tube, which you just glue in place:
Image

You need to use a piece of wire for motor retention. Something like a paper clip. In this photo I inserted 2 pins to illustrate where the holes are:
Image

A composite E motor is a really nice fit.

For the nose cone I wanted something quite long and chunky to help move the CG forward. My first proper drawing in Fusion 360:
Image
Image

I designed it in 2 parts to make it easier to print. So the plug and shock cord attachment point was a separate drawing:
Image

The kevlar shock cord will go through the big hole and then through the 2 smaller holes in a figure of 8 for extra strength.
Image

The nose cone and plug printed:
Image

Image

Both the nose cone and the fin can weigh 65g, so the CG will be near the middle of the rocket (without a motor and chute). I am hoping the complete rocket will be under 250g.

I decided to make a feature out of the launch lugs so designed these rings with a stand off to clear the fat nose cone:
Image

And a matching ring to go up near the nose cone, for decorative purposes only:
Image

3 rings printed:
Image

And finally the BT60 body tube masked up ready for priming. I masked where the rings will be glued to the tube:
Image

I plan to leave the blue bits blue and paint the body tube red.

Aquaman33
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 256
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:12 pm

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby Aquaman33 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:04 pm

And a few days later the build is complete.

Image

Image Image

I have done nothing to the 3d printed parts to finish them. I decided to just leave them as they are. I could have spent hours sanding, filling and painting, but I decided to keep them true to their origin.

It was a really fun quick build.

A smaller version of this would make a great entry level kit for kids. Assembly takes a few minutes and you are ready to fly. No fins to attach and align. The 3d printer does most of the work.

I will miss our club's last launch of 2019, but hopefully I can fly this early in 2020.

Now to get back to my level 2 build!

joeman
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 395
Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2015 9:05 am

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby joeman » Mon Dec 23, 2019 10:18 pm

Really awesome. I like post with all close up photos of the parts and the designs.

I have a few questions...
* What filament did you use? ABS plastic?
* What sort of fill did you use? 15% or more?
* Any other (non-default) settings set for the print?

I once used 3-D printer to create parts for "Fly-away-Rails" launcher for one of my rockets (BumbleBee). It worked well. Though I did have to go through quite a few iterations until I was satisfied they would work; that they were strong enough.
I did notice during my travels, that other people made fly-away-rails (with a 3-D printer I presume) but out some other material. Never had time to investigate, but it was a stronger, more flexible material. Stronger than the usual ABS stuff I use. Something I must find out about.

Anyhow, hope your L2 build is going well.

Cheers

Joe
L1 - Callisto (H133) - 11-Jan-2016
L2 - March Fly (1633K940) - 18-Mar-2018 - RSO

Aquaman33
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 256
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:12 pm

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby Aquaman33 » Tue Dec 24, 2019 9:40 pm

joeman wrote:Really awesome. I like post with all close up photos of the parts and the designs.

I have a few questions...
* What filament did you use? ABS plastic?
* What sort of fill did you use? 15% or more?
* Any other (non-default) settings set for the print?

I once used 3-D printer to create parts for "Fly-away-Rails" launcher for one of my rockets (BumbleBee). It worked well. Though I did have to go through quite a few iterations until I was satisfied they would work; that they were strong enough.
I did notice during my travels, that other people made fly-away-rails (with a 3-D printer I presume) but out some other material. Never had time to investigate, but it was a stronger, more flexible material. Stronger than the usual ABS stuff I use. Something I must find out about.

Anyhow, hope your L2 build is going well.

Cheers

Joe


Hi Joe,

Thanks for all you comments.

The filament I used is PLA+. Apparently its "10 x stronger" than standard PLA. I haven't use ABS because I don't have an enclosure to manage the temperature and I am a little concerned about the fumes. My printer is in my house and I have young kids. For parts where I need more strength I use PETG, which is a lot stronger than PLA+.

I used 75% infill for the fin can and 100% infill for the nose cone plug because they are the most likely points of failure. I used 20% infill for the other parts, because strength was less of an issue. The nose cone is hollow with thin walls so infill is not really that relevant.

I printed at 200 degrees nozzle and 50 degrees bed. Speed was 50mm/s. Layer height was 0.15mm.

The finish is quite good, but you can clearly see its 3d printed. But I am happy with that. It's true to itself.

I haven't glued the fin can in place yet and I am considering attaching it with some sheer pins (that shouldn't actually sheer). This means I can replace the fin can if I snap a fin.

The level 2 project is slowly grinding forward. I am experimenting with homemade fiberglass body tubes. I am start to think that making a 150mm diameter tube may have been a bit ambitious for my first attempt at a homemade tube, but I am learning fast!

Cheers,

Derek


Return to “Low Powered Rocketry”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests