Minimum diameter 38 mm high altitude rocket - how to recover

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jez_tranter
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Minimum diameter 38 mm high altitude rocket - how to recover

Postby jez_tranter » Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:47 pm

I am fairly new to rocketry and have recently launched my Rocketarium Kilter ARM kit rocket on D motors with much success.

However as you may expect I am now looking to my next project and the idea of fast, high altitude rockets is definitely attractive.

I have been considering the Public Missiles Cirrus Dart - mainly because it is relatively inexpensive but has the flexibility for me to begin with some smaller F and G motors but potentially could be launched all the way up to J motors. In my mind this seems like a good stepping stone for me to use to to get my TRA certs.

However I am a little stuck (concerned) with the recovery from high altitude launches with a minimum diameter rocket. Obviously I want this thing back if I am to spend all my hard saved rocket funds.

Can you guys give some advice on the best way to recover such a rocket?

I'm thinking that dual deploy would be the way to go - but not sure if there is enough room to fit the required electronics? I have seen some of the PML CPR 3000 systems but they seem to be too big for 38 mm?

Is a custom deployment system required - I'm not afraid of this as I am an electrical engineer by day - just need to be pointed in the right direction.

I'm pretty keen to stay with at least a main parachute as that is required for the TRA certs.

Any other comments/advice welcome.

Thanks

Jeremy

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Re: Minimum diameter 38 mm high altitude rocket - how to rec

Postby Lamp » Wed Feb 13, 2013 5:57 am

G'day Jeremy, if you want to go with the dual deploy option, have a look at the Featherweight Raven altimeter and 38mm Av bay.... :wink:
‘It takes sixty-five thousand errors before you are qualified to make a rocket.’ — Werhner von Braun
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Re: Minimum diameter 38 mm high altitude rocket - how to rec

Postby cryoscum » Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:02 am

Lamp wrote:G'day Jeremy, if you want to go with the dual deploy option, have a look at the Featherweight Raven altimeter and 38mm Av bay.... :wink:


Agreed on the choice. I use them almost exclusively. You can get these from several suppliers overseas and also from the owner of this forum (just click on the banner at the top). They cost about the same whether you get it from the states or locally, but you don't fork out for international shipping if local. You'll also have support (i.e. someone you can phone with questions, but the forum is just as helpful :) ) There are other flight computer options available, but its hard to beat the Raven for size, features, reliability and cost.

The move to flight computers is virtually inevitable if you're planning on doing the TRA certs. Once you're truly into high power, motor ejection becomes virtually impossible and is often not even an option on the larger reloadable motors.

Cheers
Nic
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Total impulse for 2016: 32,458 Ns (thus far)
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Re: Minimum diameter 38 mm high altitude rocket - how to rec

Postby ROCKet STAR » Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:02 am

Hi Jeremy, welcome to the forum.

Another thing to consider with a project like this is finding it! A 38mm minimum diameter rocket on a "J" will exceed 10,000' without even breaking a sweat! You wont be able to track it visually to apogee, and you are unlikely to see it on it's way back down. There are two things that will be greatly improve your chances if finding it. The first being sone kind of tracking electronics. Wooshtronics sell the EasyAs RDF (radio direction finding) beacon that could be squeezed into a 38mm nosecone fairly easily. Otherwise there are several nice small GPS tracking devices commercially available. The second thing is bright colours. They may not help you much in the air, but on the ground, fluro orange or fluro pink will realy improve your chances of spotting it from a distance.
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jez_tranter
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Re: Minimum diameter 38 mm high altitude rocket - how to rec

Postby jez_tranter » Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:32 am

Awesome - thanks for the info guys.

Any recommendations on the GPS trackers?

Also is black powder the best choice for deployment as a first timer? Especially with the 38 mm airframe...

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Re: Minimum diameter 38 mm high altitude rocket - how to rec

Postby Lamp » Wed Feb 13, 2013 11:11 am

jez_tranter wrote:Also is black powder the best choice for deployment as a first timer? Especially with the 38 mm airframe...


Yes....black powder is pretty much it for small rockets, you could use a CO2 based system like the Rousetech CD3 but I do not think any CO2 based system will fit inside a 38mm rocket. Black powder is easy and reliable if you know what you are doing.
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