3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Discussions on low powered model rockets using E powered motors and below.

Moderator: Moderators

Aquaman33
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 263
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:12 pm

3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby Aquaman33 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 6:21 pm

I bought a new 3d printer and to celebrate I thought I would teach myself how to use Fusion 360. Until now I have been using SketchUp, which served a purpose, but had some limitations.

I thought I should put my very limited Fusion 360 skills and my new printer to the test with a fun, simple rocket designed to fly on D and E motors.

I started by drawing various fin cans, but in the end I decided to go with this one from Thingiverse:
Image

The design can be found here:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3614897
Thanks "Works of Claye".

At first I printed it in clear filament, then I learnt that clear filament is quite brittle because it doesn't have many additives in it. So I re-printed it in blue:
Image

Image

Image

It is nicely designed to take a 24mm motor mount tube, which you just glue in place:
Image

You need to use a piece of wire for motor retention. Something like a paper clip. In this photo I inserted 2 pins to illustrate where the holes are:
Image

A composite E motor is a really nice fit.

For the nose cone I wanted something quite long and chunky to help move the CG forward. My first proper drawing in Fusion 360:
Image
Image

I designed it in 2 parts to make it easier to print. So the plug and shock cord attachment point was a separate drawing:
Image

The kevlar shock cord will go through the big hole and then through the 2 smaller holes in a figure of 8 for extra strength.
Image

The nose cone and plug printed:
Image

Image

Both the nose cone and the fin can weigh 65g, so the CG will be near the middle of the rocket (without a motor and chute). I am hoping the complete rocket will be under 250g.

I decided to make a feature out of the launch lugs so designed these rings with a stand off to clear the fat nose cone:
Image

And a matching ring to go up near the nose cone, for decorative purposes only:
Image

3 rings printed:
Image

And finally the BT60 body tube masked up ready for priming. I masked where the rings will be glued to the tube:
Image

I plan to leave the blue bits blue and paint the body tube red.

Aquaman33
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 263
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:12 pm

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby Aquaman33 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:04 pm

And a few days later the build is complete.

Image

Image Image

I have done nothing to the 3d printed parts to finish them. I decided to just leave them as they are. I could have spent hours sanding, filling and painting, but I decided to keep them true to their origin.

It was a really fun quick build.

A smaller version of this would make a great entry level kit for kids. Assembly takes a few minutes and you are ready to fly. No fins to attach and align. The 3d printer does most of the work.

I will miss our club's last launch of 2019, but hopefully I can fly this early in 2020.

Now to get back to my level 2 build!

joeman
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 395
Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2015 9:05 am

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby joeman » Mon Dec 23, 2019 10:18 pm

Really awesome. I like post with all close up photos of the parts and the designs.

I have a few questions...
* What filament did you use? ABS plastic?
* What sort of fill did you use? 15% or more?
* Any other (non-default) settings set for the print?

I once used 3-D printer to create parts for "Fly-away-Rails" launcher for one of my rockets (BumbleBee). It worked well. Though I did have to go through quite a few iterations until I was satisfied they would work; that they were strong enough.
I did notice during my travels, that other people made fly-away-rails (with a 3-D printer I presume) but out some other material. Never had time to investigate, but it was a stronger, more flexible material. Stronger than the usual ABS stuff I use. Something I must find out about.

Anyhow, hope your L2 build is going well.

Cheers

Joe
L1 - Callisto (H133) - 11-Jan-2016
L2 - March Fly (1633K940) - 18-Mar-2018 - RSO

Aquaman33
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 263
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:12 pm

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby Aquaman33 » Tue Dec 24, 2019 9:40 pm

joeman wrote:Really awesome. I like post with all close up photos of the parts and the designs.

I have a few questions...
* What filament did you use? ABS plastic?
* What sort of fill did you use? 15% or more?
* Any other (non-default) settings set for the print?

I once used 3-D printer to create parts for "Fly-away-Rails" launcher for one of my rockets (BumbleBee). It worked well. Though I did have to go through quite a few iterations until I was satisfied they would work; that they were strong enough.
I did notice during my travels, that other people made fly-away-rails (with a 3-D printer I presume) but out some other material. Never had time to investigate, but it was a stronger, more flexible material. Stronger than the usual ABS stuff I use. Something I must find out about.

Anyhow, hope your L2 build is going well.

Cheers

Joe


Hi Joe,

Thanks for all you comments.

The filament I used is PLA+. Apparently its "10 x stronger" than standard PLA. I haven't use ABS because I don't have an enclosure to manage the temperature and I am a little concerned about the fumes. My printer is in my house and I have young kids. For parts where I need more strength I use PETG, which is a lot stronger than PLA+.

I used 75% infill for the fin can and 100% infill for the nose cone plug because they are the most likely points of failure. I used 20% infill for the other parts, because strength was less of an issue. The nose cone is hollow with thin walls so infill is not really that relevant.

I printed at 200 degrees nozzle and 50 degrees bed. Speed was 50mm/s. Layer height was 0.15mm.

The finish is quite good, but you can clearly see its 3d printed. But I am happy with that. It's true to itself.

I haven't glued the fin can in place yet and I am considering attaching it with some sheer pins (that shouldn't actually sheer). This means I can replace the fin can if I snap a fin.

The level 2 project is slowly grinding forward. I am experimenting with homemade fiberglass body tubes. I am start to think that making a 150mm diameter tube may have been a bit ambitious for my first attempt at a homemade tube, but I am learning fast!

Cheers,

Derek

Aquaman33
Rocket Crew
Rocket Crew
Posts: 263
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:12 pm

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby Aquaman33 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 9:54 am

Yesterday this rocket had its maiden flight at NSWRA's launch.

As you can see it had some good company on the launch pad.

Image

It went up nice and straight on a D12-3

Image

The chute deployed right at apogee, but it appears the nose cone hit one of the fins and snapped it off.

Image

I know many people are cynical about 3d printed fins, but I see this as a freak accident rather than a manufacturing failure.

The rocket landed softly and no fins were damaged on landing.

I will make a few changes before it flies again:
- Print a new fin can from stronger filament, with 100% infill.
- Print a new lighter nose cone.
- Lengthen the shock cord.

I believe its easily stable enough to cope with those changes.

....and it will fly again.

User avatar
SpaceManMat
Astronaut
Astronaut
Posts: 2220
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 9:56 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: 3d Printed Rocket for D and E Motors

Postby SpaceManMat » Mon Jan 27, 2020 6:44 pm

Nice one, I need to try out some more 3D printing for rockets I think.
QRS: 124
AMRS: 32 L2 RSO
Highest Altitude: 13,647 feet
Fastest Flight: Mach 1.55
Largest Motor: CTI 1115J530 IM
Current Project: X Wing


Return to “Low Powered Rocketry”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests